Showing posts tagged Mississippi.
x

Under the Mountain Bunker

Leave me a message   Location: Colorado. More info here.



» Website

twitter.com/charyl:

    Campaign ads for people who should listen to them (but won’t)

    Obama super PAC launches Bain offensive – “Whether the companies they came in and worked with made money or not, was irrelevant. Bain Capital always made money,” Wells says in the ad. “If we lost, they made money. If we survived, they made money. It’s as simple as that.” Wells warns: “He promised us the same things he’s promising the United States. And he’ll give you the same thing he gave us: nothing. He’ll take it all.” […] The key message point in the Priorities ad is the argument that Romney and Bain were making money through a rigged game, in which they’d be sure to turn a profit regardless of how their acquisitions fared.

    And here’s a video reminder on what kind of people would never be swayed by such “information” or “reality” when it comes to voting for anyone but the Republican (even Romney) on any presidential ticket:


    INTERVIEWER: So, something’s not working here.
    TOOTHLESS GUY ON FOOD STAMPS: That’s right.
    INTV: Voting Republican hasn’t worked for you.
    TGOFS: But it could.
    INTV: But it hasn’t.
    TGOFS: It hasn’t but it could.

    Take that Obama! Let the eagle soar! 

    — 1 year ago with 1 note
    #class war  #income redistribution  #news  #politics  #unemployment  #vote!  #2. austerity for the rest of us  #alexandra pelosi  #bain capital  #Bill Maher  #corporatism  #GOP  #gst steel  #job creator  #job destroyer  #let the eagle soar!  #Mississippi  #Mitt Romney  #pat wells  #plutocracy  #President Obama  #priorities usa  #profit over people  #Republicans  #rigged game  #war on the middle class  #1. tax cuts for the wealthy 
    …
Frank Rich: Despite Santorum’s victories, the consensus the morning after seems to be that nothing has really changed. So does it matter what happened in Alabama and Mississippi? Let’s not forget American Samoa, where Romney romped, taking all nine delegates. (Never mind that its inhabitants — a disproportionate number of them Mormons, by the way — cannot vote in an actual presidential election.) But anyhow: No, Alabama and Mississippi didn’t matter, not even to Newt, who, despite losing both his “must-win” Southern states, has decided to ignore the verdict and soldier on. Although perhaps on an austerity budget: Callista was conspicuously bling-free during her husband’s “victory” oration.

    Frank Rich: Despite Santorum’s victories, the consensus the morning after seems to be that nothing has really changed. So does it matter what happened in Alabama and Mississippi? Let’s not forget American Samoa, where Romney romped, taking all nine delegates. (Never mind that its inhabitants — a disproportionate number of them Mormons, by the way — cannot vote in an actual presidential election.) But anyhow: No, Alabama and Mississippi didn’t matter, not even to Newt, who, despite losing both his “must-win” Southern states, has decided to ignore the verdict and soldier on. Although perhaps on an austerity budget: Callista was conspicuously bling-free during her husband’s “victory” oration.

    — 2 years ago with 2 notes
    #news  #politics  #the south  #alabama  #mississippi  #nothing has changed  #doesn't matter  #rick santorum  #newt gingrich  #mitt romney 

    Real Time with Bill Maher correspondent, Alexandra Pelosi interviews Mississippi residents.

    (Source: underthemountainbunker.com)

    — 2 years ago with 5 notes
    #politics  #gop  #republicans  #teaparty  #bill maher  #alexandra pelosi  #mississippi 
    …
Mississippi and Alabama: is this where brain cells go to die? - In Mississippi only 12% of voters think Obama’s a Christian to 52% who think he’s a Muslim and 36% who are not sure. In Alabama just 14% think Obama’s a Christian to 45% who think he’s a Muslim and 41% who aren’t sure. […] In Mississippi …only 54% of voters think [interracial marriage] should be legal, while 29% believe it should be illegal. […] Finally there’s considerable skepticism about evolution among GOP voters in both Alabama and Mississippi. In Alabama only 26% of voters believe in it, while 60% do not. In Mississippi just 22% believe in it, while 66% do not.

    Mississippi and Alabama: is this where brain cells go to die? - In Mississippi only 12% of voters think Obama’s a Christian to 52% who think he’s a Muslim and 36% who are not sure. In Alabama just 14% think Obama’s a Christian to 45% who think he’s a Muslim and 41% who aren’t sure. […] In Mississippi …only 54% of voters think [interracial marriage] should be legal, while 29% believe it should be illegal. […] Finally there’s considerable skepticism about evolution among GOP voters in both Alabama and Mississippi. In Alabama only 26% of voters believe in it, while 60% do not. In Mississippi just 22% believe in it, while 66% do not.

    — 2 years ago with 5 notes
    #news  #politics  #mississippi  #alabama  #obama's religion  #evolution  #interracial marriage 
    "Despite the harm caused by a harsh immigration law in the neighboring state of Alabama, Mississippi State Rep. Becky Currie (R) filed a bill, HB 488, that would implement an Alabama-style law in Mississippi. Unlike anti-immigrant laws in states like Georgia and Arizona, Currie’s bill includes Alabama’s unconstitutional provisions driving the children of immigrants out of schools and potentially making it a felony for undocumented immigrants to take a shower."
    — 2 years ago with 4 notes
    #news  #politics  #immigration  #becky currie  #mississippi  #anti-immigration laws  #republican hate 
    Hundreds in Mississippi seek 24 Tyson Foods jobs paying $8.60 an hour →

    About 100 people were in line when the doors opened at the Vicksburg, Miss., WIN Job Center, where applications were taken from those interested in 24 job openings at Tyson Foods’ plant in Warren County.

    But 90 minutes later, some 900 names of applicants had been written on lists circulating among the job-seekers.

    Office manager Timothy Crudup told The Vicksburg Post that Friday’s crowd far exceeded the usual number of job candidates seen at the facility, and he said it’s a sign of a bleak local jobs market.

    "I’ve been here 11 years, and yeah, it’s more than last year, too," he said.

    Unemployment in Warren County was 11.7 percent in September, up from 11 percent in August. Mississippi’s rate was 10.6 percent for the month, up half a percent. Figures for October have not been released.

    The company was looking to fill manual labor and support positions that pay $8.60 an hour and involve straightening products on conveyor belts and handling 10- to 40-pound product cases at the plant. U.S. minimum wage is $7.25 an hour.

    This reminds me of the Chicago Board of Trade’s latest LET THEM EAT CAKE moment this week.

    — 2 years ago with 5 notes
    #news  #politics  #jobs  #unemployment  #ows  #99percent  #tyson foods  #mcdonalds  #mississippi  #chicago 
    Haley Barbour: Just a good ol’ boy
Via Maddow:

Mr. Barbour is working on the new fake history of the South again, with an interview in the Weekly Standard. He praises the Citizens Council, which used to be called the White Citizens Council, for keeping the peace when his hometown schools integrated:

“You  heard of the Citizens Councils? Up north they think it was  like the  KKK. Where I come from it was an organization of town leaders.  In Yazoo  City they passed a resolution that said anybody who started a  chapter  of the Klan would get their ass run out of town. If you had a  job,  you’d lose it. If you had a store, they’d see nobody shopped there.  We  didn’t have a problem with the Klan in Yazoo City.”

(link) 

Matt Yglesias breaks down the ACTUAL history of the Citizen’s Council in the South:


The  Citizens’ Councils were, right in the state of Mississippi where   Barbour is from, the respectable face of white supremacist political   activism. Here’s an example from the Association of Citizens’ Councils pamphlet: “Why Does Your Community Need a Citizens’ Council?”

Maybe  your community has had no racial problems! This may  be true; however,  you may not have a fire, yet you maintain a fire  department. You can  depend on one thing: The NAACP (National Association  for the Agitation  of Colored People), aided by alien influences, bloc  vote seeking  politicians and left-wing do-gooders, will see that you  have a problem  in the near future.
The Citizens’ Council is the South’s answer to the mongrelizers. We will not be integrated. We are proud of our white blood and our white heritage of sixty centuries.

Haley Barbour gives these people credit for keeping things calm!
(link)

Yglesias adds this:

In  Mississippi in the 1950s and 60s most white people were white   supremacists. And within the large and powerful white supremacist   community, there was a split between more moderate and more radical   factions. The moderates pursued a strategy of economic coercion and the   radicals pursued a strategy of violence. There was also a small  minority  of white proponents of racial equality. In Barbour’s home town  of Yazoo  City, Mississippi the moderate faction of white supremacists  had the  upper hand. And Barbour thinks the strength of moderate white   supremacists helped create a beneficial political atmosphere in his   hometown.
(link)

When  you have to choose between radical white supremacists and moderate  white supremacists, you’re still going to end up with white supremacists  (i.e. racists).
Charles Johnson explains “there was a lot of crossover between the CC and the KKK:” (link)

White Citizens’ Council: African  Americans who were seen as being too supportive  of desegregation,  voting rights, or other perceived threats to whites’  supremacy found  themselves and their family members unemployed in many  instances;  whites who supported civil rights for African Americans were  not immune  from finding this happening to them as well. Members of the  Citizens’  Council were sometimes Klansmen, and the more influential the  Citizens’  Council member, the more influence he had with the Klan. In   fact, the WCC was even referred to during the civil rights era as “an   uptown Klan,” “a white collar Klan,” “a button-down Klan,” and “a   country club Klan.” The rationale for these nicknames was that  it  appeared that sheets and hoods had been discarded and replaced by  suits  and ties. Much like the Klan, WCC members held documented white   supremacist views and involved themselves in racist activities. They   more often held leadership in civic and political organizations,   however, which enabled them to legitimize discriminatory practices aimed   at non-whites.

And for your further reading “pleasure” (sarcasm), here’s a link to the archives of the Citizens Council newspaper. This kind of information reminds me why as a “Northerner,” I’ve never romanticized the South (or movies like Gone With The Wind). And even though I know good people live in the South, the term “Deep South” instantly reminds me of Deliverance and the KKK. 
Bottom line: People like Haley Barbour just reinforce these connotations for the entire world.

    Haley Barbour: Just a good ol’ boy

    Via Maddow:

    Mr. Barbour is working on the new fake history of the South again, with an interview in the Weekly Standard. He praises the Citizens Council, which used to be called the White Citizens Council, for keeping the peace when his hometown schools integrated:

    “You heard of the Citizens Councils? Up north they think it was like the KKK. Where I come from it was an organization of town leaders. In Yazoo City they passed a resolution that said anybody who started a chapter of the Klan would get their ass run out of town. If you had a job, you’d lose it. If you had a store, they’d see nobody shopped there. We didn’t have a problem with the Klan in Yazoo City.”

    (link)

    Matt Yglesias breaks down the ACTUAL history of the Citizen’s Council in the South:

    The Citizens’ Councils were, right in the state of Mississippi where Barbour is from, the respectable face of white supremacist political activism. Here’s an example from the Association of Citizens’ Councils pamphlet: “Why Does Your Community Need a Citizens’ Council?”

    Maybe your community has had no racial problems! This may be true; however, you may not have a fire, yet you maintain a fire department. You can depend on one thing: The NAACP (National Association for the Agitation of Colored People), aided by alien influences, bloc vote seeking politicians and left-wing do-gooders, will see that you have a problem in the near future.

    The Citizens’ Council is the South’s answer to the mongrelizers. We will not be integrated. We are proud of our white blood and our white heritage of sixty centuries.

    Haley Barbour gives these people credit for keeping things calm!

    (link)

    Yglesias adds this:

    In Mississippi in the 1950s and 60s most white people were white supremacists. And within the large and powerful white supremacist community, there was a split between more moderate and more radical factions. The moderates pursued a strategy of economic coercion and the radicals pursued a strategy of violence. There was also a small minority of white proponents of racial equality. In Barbour’s home town of Yazoo City, Mississippi the moderate faction of white supremacists had the upper hand. And Barbour thinks the strength of moderate white supremacists helped create a beneficial political atmosphere in his hometown.

    (link)

    When you have to choose between radical white supremacists and moderate white supremacists, you’re still going to end up with white supremacists (i.e. racists).

    Charles Johnson explains “there was a lot of crossover between the CC and the KKK:” (link)

    White Citizens’ Council: African Americans who were seen as being too supportive of desegregation, voting rights, or other perceived threats to whites’ supremacy found themselves and their family members unemployed in many instances; whites who supported civil rights for African Americans were not immune from finding this happening to them as well. Members of the Citizens’ Council were sometimes Klansmen, and the more influential the Citizens’ Council member, the more influence he had with the Klan. In fact, the WCC was even referred to during the civil rights era as “an uptown Klan,” “a white collar Klan,” “a button-down Klan,” and “a country club Klan.” The rationale for these nicknames was that it appeared that sheets and hoods had been discarded and replaced by suits and ties. Much like the Klan, WCC members held documented white supremacist views and involved themselves in racist activities. They more often held leadership in civic and political organizations, however, which enabled them to legitimize discriminatory practices aimed at non-whites.

    And for your further reading “pleasure” (sarcasm), here’s a link to the archives of the Citizens Council newspaper. This kind of information reminds me why as a “Northerner,” I’ve never romanticized the South (or movies like Gone With The Wind). And even though I know good people live in the South, the term “Deep South” instantly reminds me of Deliverance and the KKK.

    Bottom line: People like Haley Barbour just reinforce these connotations for the entire world.

    — 3 years ago
    #haley barbour,  #KKK,  #segregation,  #NAACP,  #mississippi  #citizens council  #white citizens council  #racism  #the South  #Barbour 2012!