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The Deepwater Horizon disaster: the perception  of new Science Committee Chair Rep. Ralph Hall (R-TX) vs. the crew (and  everyone else)
Here’s  an “interesting” way to look at the Deepwater Horizon disaster, I  guess, courtesy of new the Science Committee Chair, Rep. Ralph Hall  (R-TX).

Rep. Ralph Hall plans to pursue an aggressive pro-oil agenda as the incoming chair of the House Science and Technology  Committee…[Hall] explained why the BP disaster “didn’t dampen his  enthusiasm for  offshore drilling.” Hall described the BP explosion that  killed eleven  men, injured dozens, and led to the despoilment of the  Gulf of Mexico as  a “tremendous,” “blossoming” flower of energy:

As  we saw that thing bubbling out, blossoming out  – all that energy,  every minute of every hour of every day of every  week – that was  tremendous to me. That we could deliver that kind of  energy out there –  even on an explosion.

(via)

But here’s another — and I’ll argue, more realistic — perception of the disaster: the NY Times has an article describing the explosion as nothing less than horrific: 

Crew   members were cut down by shrapnel, hurled across rooms and  buried    under smoking wreckage. Some were swallowed by fireballs that  raced    through the oil rig’s shattered interior. Dazed and battered survivors, half-naked and     dripping in highly combustible gas, crawled inch by inch in pitch     darkness, willing themselves to the lifeboat deck. 
It was no better there.
That  same explosion had ignited a firestorm that enveloped the rig’s    derrick. Searing heat baked the lifeboat deck. Crew members, certain    they were about to be cooked alive, scrambled into enclosed lifeboats    for shelter, only to find them like smoke-filled ovens.
(via)

Won’t the 112th Congress be just awesome?
Read in full: 
Deepwater Horizon’s Final Hours
New Science Committee Chair Ralph Hall Praises ‘Tremendous’ BP Spill

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    The Deepwater Horizon disaster: the perception of new Science Committee Chair Rep. Ralph Hall (R-TX) vs. the crew (and everyone else)

    Here’s an “interesting” way to look at the Deepwater Horizon disaster, I guess, courtesy of new the Science Committee Chair, Rep. Ralph Hall (R-TX).

    Rep. Ralph Hall plans to pursue an aggressive pro-oil agenda as the incoming chair of the House Science and Technology Committee…[Hall] explained why the BP disaster “didn’t dampen his enthusiasm for offshore drilling.” Hall described the BP explosion that killed eleven men, injured dozens, and led to the despoilment of the Gulf of Mexico as a “tremendous,” “blossoming” flower of energy:

    As we saw that thing bubbling out, blossoming out – all that energy, every minute of every hour of every day of every week – that was tremendous to me. That we could deliver that kind of energy out there – even on an explosion.

    (via)

    But here’s another — and I’ll argue, more realistic — perception of the disaster: the NY Times has an article describing the explosion as nothing less than horrific:

    Crew members were cut down by shrapnel, hurled across rooms and buried under smoking wreckage. Some were swallowed by fireballs that raced through the oil rig’s shattered interior. Dazed and battered survivors, half-naked and dripping in highly combustible gas, crawled inch by inch in pitch darkness, willing themselves to the lifeboat deck.

    It was no better there.

    That same explosion had ignited a firestorm that enveloped the rig’s derrick. Searing heat baked the lifeboat deck. Crew members, certain they were about to be cooked alive, scrambled into enclosed lifeboats for shelter, only to find them like smoke-filled ovens.

    (via)

    Won’t the 112th Congress be just awesome?

    Read in full:

    — 3 years ago
    #deepwater horizon  #disaster  #gulf  #oil rig crew  #rep. ralph hall (r-tx)  #incoming chair of the House Science and Technology Committee  #tremendous blossoming flower of energy  #horrific disaster 
    The butterfly effect →

    Japan’s crisis has now affected 923 workers in Shreveport, Louisiana – who’s next?  If a small change in a complex system can have large effects elsewhere, imagine everything that has been put into motion with the enormity of last Friday’s disaster.

    — 3 years ago
    #news  #jobs  #butterfly effect  #disaster  #GM plant  #japan  #shreveport louisiana 
    British government emails show a PR campaign to play down Fukushima disaster ☢ →

    The government last week confirmed plans for eight new nuclear stations in England and Wales.

    Released emails reveal that the British government launched a PR campaign specifically to play down the Fukushima nuclear disaster. The business and energy departments approached British energy companies like EDF, Areva and Westinghouse to come up with a plan to prevent the nuclear situation at Fukushima Daichi from doing damage to plans for new nuclear stations. The emails, which the Guardian got a hold of, show a fear of the “anti-nuclear chaps and chapesses,” as one official put it. They were particularly concerned about what comparisons to Chernobyl might do to the public image of the nuclear energy industry. View the emails here. (AP Photograph.)

    via

    — 2 years ago with 2 notes
    #politics  #news  #disaster  #Britian  #fukushima  #nuclear plants  #nuclear disaster  #british government  #emails  #pr campaign  #disinformation campaign 
    Tips for what to eat during a hurricane or other disaster →

    From Autumn Roth, intern, Mayo Clinic:

    First, while it may seem obvious, it is important to eat the food from your fridge first, the freezer next, and after that move on to foods you may have stocked in your pantry. Do not discard frozen and refrigerated foods right when the power goes out. I was surprised to learn that foods from a well-stocked freezer will last up to 48 hours!

    Second, make sure you have a manual can opener. Although it seems obvious, it is easy to forget that your electric can opener will not work.

    Finally, stock up on some tasty condiments and seasonings. Certain condiments like mustard, ketchup and relish are good for days with no refrigeration. And these will help you spice up the usually bland pre-packaged foods.

    Oh and one last note – grab some powdered milk. Even if you’ve forgotten the hand cranked can opener, you can always just add water and have the breakfast of champions anytime of day.

    — 2 years ago with 7 notes
    #disaster  #hurricane irene  #mayo clinic  #power outages  #tips  #what to eat 
    Photo above: via: @denverpost Before and after views of neighborhoods burned by the‪ #WaldoCanyonFire‬: http://dpo.st/KG1K7j  by @CharlesMinshew
Update Colorado wildfires: Waldo Canyon Fire, High Park Fire — President Obama to visit Colorado today 
Current stats from Inciweb:
HIGH PARK FIRE: (7:00 PM MT)
TOTAL PERSONNEL — 1,125  
SIZE — 87,284 acres
PERCENT CONTAINED — 85%
HOMES LOST — 257
COST TO DATE — $36.4 million
High Park Fire: 1,900 evacuees from High Park Fire near Fort Collins to return home
WALDO CANYON FIRE: (9:00 PM MT)
TOTAL PERSONNEL — 1,118   
SIZE — 16,750 acres
PERCENT CONTAINED — 15%
HOMES LOST — 347
COST TO DATE — $5.2 million
Waldo Canyon Fire:Waldo Canyon Fire evacuees crowd hotels, as thousands remain displaced
Waldo Canyon Fire: Police Chief Pete Carey said late Thursday the remains of one person were found in a home where two people had been reported missing.
More…

    Photo above: via: @denverpost Before and after views of neighborhoods burned by the‪ #WaldoCanyonFire‬http://dpo.st/KG1K7j  by @CharlesMinshew

    Update Colorado wildfires: Waldo Canyon Fire, High Park Fire — President Obama to visit Colorado today

    Current stats from Inciweb:

    HIGH PARK FIRE: (7:00 PM MT)

    TOTAL PERSONNEL — 1,125  

    SIZE — 87,284 acres

    PERCENT CONTAINED — 85%

    HOMES LOST — 257

    COST TO DATE — $36.4 million

    WALDO CANYON FIRE: (9:00 PM MT)

    TOTAL PERSONNEL — 1,118   

    SIZE — 16,750 acres

    PERCENT CONTAINED — 15%

    HOMES LOST — 347

    COST TO DATE — $5.2 million

    More…

    — 1 year ago
    #animals / nature  #news  #people  #security / safety  #survival  #Colorado  #colorado is burning  #colorado springs  #deaths  #disaster  #disaster declaration  #firefighters  #fires  #fort collins  #high park fire  #homes destroyed  #how to help  #President Obama  #victims  #waldo canyon fire  #wildfires 
    dendroica:

Waldo Canyon Fire Burn Scar by NASA Goddard Photo and Video on Flickr.
The Waldo Canyon Fire was first reported on June 23, 2012, burning in Pike National Forest, three miles (5 kilometers) west of Colorado Springs. Fueled by extremely dry conditions and strong winds, it had burned 18,247 acres (74 square kilometers) by July 5. The blaze severely damaged or destroyed 346 homes, making it the most destructive fire in Colorado history. Mountain Shadows, a neighborhood northwest of the Colorado Springs city center, experienced some of the most severe damage. According to an analysis conducted by the Denver Post, the combined value of the homes that burned to the ground in the neighborhood was at least $110 million. The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on the Terra satellite acquired this view of the burn scar on July 4, 2012, when the fire was still burning but was 90 percent contained. Vegetation-covered land is red in the false-color image, which includes both visible and infrared light. Patches of unburned forest are bright red, in contrast with areas where flecks of light brown indicate some burning. The darkest brown areas are the most severely burned. Buildings, roads, and other developed areas appear light gray and white. The bright red patches of vegetation near Colorado Springs are golf courses, parks, or other irrigated land. NASA Earth Observatory image by Jesse Allen and Robert Simmon using data from the NASA/GSFC/METI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team. Caption by Adam Voiland. Instrument: Terra - ASTER

    dendroica:

    Waldo Canyon Fire Burn Scar by NASA Goddard Photo and Video on Flickr.

    The Waldo Canyon Fire was first reported on June 23, 2012, burning in Pike National Forest, three miles (5 kilometers) west of Colorado Springs. Fueled by extremely dry conditions and strong winds, it had burned 18,247 acres (74 square kilometers) by July 5. The blaze severely damaged or destroyed 346 homes, making it the most destructive fire in Colorado history. Mountain Shadows, a neighborhood northwest of the Colorado Springs city center, experienced some of the most severe damage. According to an analysis conducted by the Denver Post, the combined value of the homes that burned to the ground in the neighborhood was at least $110 million.

    The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on the Terra satellite acquired this view of the burn scar on July 4, 2012, when the fire was still burning but was 90 percent contained. Vegetation-covered land is red in the false-color image, which includes both visible and infrared light. Patches of unburned forest are bright red, in contrast with areas where flecks of light brown indicate some burning. The darkest brown areas are the most severely burned. Buildings, roads, and other developed areas appear light gray and white. The bright red patches of vegetation near Colorado Springs are golf courses, parks, or other irrigated land.

    NASA Earth Observatory image by Jesse Allen and Robert Simmon using data from the NASA/GSFC/METI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team. Caption by Adam Voiland.

    Instrument: Terra - ASTER

    (via sarahlee310)

    — 1 year ago with 29 notes
    #Waldo Canyon Fire  #Colorado  #wildfires  #disaster  #environment