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    @liberalchik
~

“Oh, I’m sorry — did I say rich? I meant “job creators“…  when did the business community become so sensitive that we have to  treat them like some kind of rare, exotic animal? Don’t startle them or  they’ll fly away! We need to soothe them so they can nest here and lay  their magic eggs full of jobs, WHICH NEVER HATCH, by the way.” — Bill Maher

We can all agree that they’ve banked enough tax cuts in the past  decade to create many, many jobs. Hilarious how the GOP is trying to  convince us that the wealthy are now ‘job creators’ and we shouldn’t raise taxes on the job creators.
We shouldn’t have to bribe the rich with tax cuts to create jobs. If  businesses and corporations had lots of customers (you know, people with  good, steady jobs and a little extra cash), there would be plenty of  jobs and a thriving economy. Isn’t it weird how things slow down when  the wealthy bank all their extra cash, ship American jobs overseas, and  either stagnate everyone wages or bust unions so they can pay minimum  wage with no benefits?  You’d think there was some kind of cause and  effect going on here.
The GOP would like us all to believe the wealthy might create jobs. Maybe. Someday.

    @liberalchik

    ~

    “Oh, I’m sorry — did I say rich? I meant “job creators“… when did the business community become so sensitive that we have to treat them like some kind of rare, exotic animal? Don’t startle them or they’ll fly away! We need to soothe them so they can nest here and lay their magic eggs full of jobs, WHICH NEVER HATCH, by the way.” — Bill Maher

    We can all agree that they’ve banked enough tax cuts in the past decade to create many, many jobs. Hilarious how the GOP is trying to convince us that the wealthy are now ‘job creators’ and we shouldn’t raise taxes on the job creators.

    We shouldn’t have to bribe the rich with tax cuts to create jobs. If businesses and corporations had lots of customers (you know, people with good, steady jobs and a little extra cash), there would be plenty of jobs and a thriving economy. Isn’t it weird how things slow down when the wealthy bank all their extra cash, ship American jobs overseas, and either stagnate everyone wages or bust unions so they can pay minimum wage with no benefits?  You’d think there was some kind of cause and effect going on here.

    The GOP would like us all to believe the wealthy might create jobs. Maybe. Someday.

    — 3 years ago with 16 notes
    #class war  #income redistribution  #politics  #war on the middle class  #American workers  #Bush tax cuts  #job creators  #John Boehner  #middle-class  #minimum wage  #ship american jobs overseas  #tax cuts for the rich  #the wealthy  #wage repression  #wage stagnation  #working class 
    If the debt ceiling isn’t raised, there is no scenario where Feds would be paid →

    AND YOU WOULD HOPE that means the House and Senate members wouldn’t get paid either — in fact, especially the House and Senate members. From the Federal Times:

    The government could choose to pay interest on Treasury securities, Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid, unemployment insurance and defense contractors, BPC said. But that would leave no money to fund the Education, Labor, Justice and Energy departments, Federal Highway Administration, Environmental Protection Agency, the Small Business Administration, tax refunds and veterans programs.

    Under another scenario laid out by the Bipartisan Policy Center, the government could try to protect the so-called social safety net by leaving defense contractors unpaid and instead spend on food stamps, housing assistance, veterans programs, special education grants and tuition assistance. But that would still leave large portions of the government — including the FBI, Interior, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — shuttered.

    Federal salaries and benefits? Forget about it. In the center’s list of priorities, feds don’t come close to getting paid in either scenario.

    This will be GREAT for our economy — goooo Republicans!

    Related:

    — 3 years ago
    #news  #politics  #class war  #economy  #income redistribution  #war on the middle class  #Bush's tax cuts  #debt ceiling  #federal employees  #federal workers  #Fox News  #GOP  #Greta Van Susteren  #if debt ceiling isn't raised  #job creators  #joe walsh  #John Boehner  #Michele Bachmann  #pay  #President Obama  #Republicans  #social security  #social security payments in august  #tax cuts for the rich  #tea party 
    …
Cause of the still terrible job market? The wealthy and the “great consumer bust”
Joshua Holland at Alternet discusses the fallacy of the wealthy as ‘job creators’ and the fact that without working- and middle-class consumers, there isn’t a need for more jobs. And without good jobs, Americans have no money to spend:

Consumer demand accounts for around 70 percent of our economic output. And with so much wealth having been redistributed upward through a 40-year class-war from above, American consumers are too tapped out to spend as they once did. This remains the core issue in this sluggish, largely jobless recovery. The wealthy, in their voracious appetite for a bigger piece of the national pie, are the real job-killers in this economic climate.
Don’t take my word for it. The Wall Street Journal reported this week that “the main reason U.S. companies are reluctant to step up hiring is scant demand, rather than uncertainty over government policies, according to a majority of economists” the paper surveyed. That jibes with what business owners themselves are saying. Last week, the National Federation of Independent Businesses released a survey of small businessmen and women that found widespread “pessimism about future business conditions and expected real sales gains.”
New York Times reporter David Leonhardt wrote this week that “We are living through a tremendous bust. It isn’t simply a housing bust. It’s a fizzling of the great consumer bubble that was decades in the making.”

Related:
The growing income gap, stalled economic growth, and financial deregulation
The American Dream: we’ve gone from ‘prosperity for all’ to ‘the rich takes all’
Middle America since 1979: doing more work for less money, even as corporate profits rise
Tax breaks to the wealthy will never create jobs
19 Facts About The Deindustrialization Of America


    Cause of the still terrible job market? The wealthy and the “great consumer bust”

    Joshua Holland at Alternet discusses the fallacy of the wealthy as ‘job creators’ and the fact that without working- and middle-class consumers, there isn’t a need for more jobs. And without good jobs, Americans have no money to spend:

    Consumer demand accounts for around 70 percent of our economic output. And with so much wealth having been redistributed upward through a 40-year class-war from above, American consumers are too tapped out to spend as they once did. This remains the core issue in this sluggish, largely jobless recovery. The wealthy, in their voracious appetite for a bigger piece of the national pie, are the real job-killers in this economic climate.

    Don’t take my word for it. The Wall Street Journal reported this week that “the main reason U.S. companies are reluctant to step up hiring is scant demand, rather than uncertainty over government policies, according to a majority of economists” the paper surveyed. That jibes with what business owners themselves are saying. Last week, the National Federation of Independent Businesses released a survey of small businessmen and women that found widespread “pessimism about future business conditions and expected real sales gains.”

    New York Times reporter David Leonhardt wrote this week that “We are living through a tremendous bust. It isn’t simply a housing bust. It’s a fizzling of the great consumer bubble that was decades in the making.”

    Related:

    — 3 years ago with 2 notes
    #news  #politics  #class war  #income redistribution  #war on the middle class  #consumer demand  #consumers  #GOP  #income inequality  #job creators  #middle-class  #no jobs  #Republicans  #tax cuts for the wealthy  #tea party  #wealthy  #working class 
    …
PROOF that tax cuts do not create jobs: Bush’s decade was a lost decade for U.S. economy, workers
From the Washington Post:

There has been zero net job creation since December 1999. No previous decade going back to the 1940s had job growth of less than 20 percent. Economic output rose at its slowest rate of any decade since the 1930s as well.
Middle-income households made less in 2008, when adjusted for inflation, than they did in 1999 — and the number is sure to have declined further during a difficult 2009. The Aughts were the first decade of falling median incomes since figures were first compiled in the 1960s.
And the net worth of American households — the value of their houses, retirement funds and other assets minus debts — has also declined when adjusted for inflation, compared with sharp gains in every previous decade since data were initially collected in the 1950s.
“This was the first business cycle where a working-age household ended up worse at the end of it than the beginning, and this in spite of substantial growth in productivity, which should have been able to improve everyone’s well-being,” said Lawrence Mishel, president of the Economic Policy Institute, a liberal think tank.

Those are facts — which have a liberal bias, I know. Seriously, what are the conservative / teaparty / Republican voters thinking — that MORE tax cuts, loopholes and subsidies are going to create a job? How many more decades will have to pass before they stop falling for it?  My guess: we’ll all be eating Soylent Green and living in Thunderdome by the time the GOP base wakes up.

Guess who ‘creates jobs’? It’s not the rich and powerful. It’s the working- and middle-class WITH THEIR PAYCHECKS. The job creators are the customers, who drive more business, who drive more jobs to fulfill a demand. When there are no paychecks, there’s no money to spend, no demand — no new jobs are necessary. Which brings us to the unemployment figures we have today.
And by extending tax cuts to the wealthy — which were to be temporary — the only way to make up for a lack of federal tax revenue is by cutting programs and services that the rest of us depend on. The Republican base needs to snap out of it.

    PROOF that tax cuts do not create jobs: Bush’s decade was a lost decade for U.S. economy, workers

    From the Washington Post:

    There has been zero net job creation since December 1999. No previous decade going back to the 1940s had job growth of less than 20 percent. Economic output rose at its slowest rate of any decade since the 1930s as well.

    Middle-income households made less in 2008, when adjusted for inflation, than they did in 1999 — and the number is sure to have declined further during a difficult 2009. The Aughts were the first decade of falling median incomes since figures were first compiled in the 1960s.

    And the net worth of American households — the value of their houses, retirement funds and other assets minus debts — has also declined when adjusted for inflation, compared with sharp gains in every previous decade since data were initially collected in the 1950s.

    “This was the first business cycle where a working-age household ended up worse at the end of it than the beginning, and this in spite of substantial growth in productivity, which should have been able to improve everyone’s well-being,” said Lawrence Mishel, president of the Economic Policy Institute, a liberal think tank.

    Those are facts — which have a liberal bias, I know. Seriously, what are the conservative / teaparty / Republican voters thinking — that MORE tax cuts, loopholes and subsidies are going to create a job? How many more decades will have to pass before they stop falling for it?  My guess: we’ll all be eating Soylent Green and living in Thunderdome by the time the GOP base wakes up.

    Guess who ‘creates jobs’? It’s not the rich and powerful. It’s the working- and middle-class WITH THEIR PAYCHECKS. The job creators are the customers, who drive more business, who drive more jobs to fulfill a demand. When there are no paychecks, there’s no money to spend, no demand — no new jobs are necessary. Which brings us to the unemployment figures we have today.

    And by extending tax cuts to the wealthy — which were to be temporary — the only way to make up for a lack of federal tax revenue is by cutting programs and services that the rest of us depend on. The Republican base needs to snap out of it.

    — 3 years ago with 11 notes
    #politics  #class war  #income redistribution  #unemployment  #war on the middle class  #bush decade  #Bush's tax cuts  #George W Bush  #GOP  #job creators  #lost decade  #middle-class  #never before has there been zero net job creation  #Republicans  #rich and powerful  #spending cuts  #tax cuts for the wealthy  #tea party  #working class  #ZERO net job creation 
    This morning’s good news and bad news… →

    First the good news (for the Teaparty Republicans and the 1% they fight for):

    Tax Rates For Millionaires Have Fallen 25 Percent Since 1995 | The Center for American Progress’ Seth Hanlon took a look at new IRS data and found that “as a percentage of their incomes, millionaires are now paying about one-quarter less of their income to federal taxes than they did in the mid-1990s”:

    “Millionaires paid an average tax rate of 22.4 percent in 2009, down by a quarter since 1995, when they paid an average of 30.4 percent,” Hanlon noted.

    Now the bad news (for the remaining 99% of us):

    Average Income Falls To Lowest Level Since 1997 | According to newly released tax data, “U.S. incomes plummeted again in 2009, with total income down 15.2 percent in real terms since 2007.” 2009′s average income of $54,283, which is the latest available data, “was at its lowest level since 1997 when it was $54,265 in 2009 dollars, just $18 less than in 2009.”

    Possible solution:

    Your morning must-read: Andy Kroll breaks down Tuesday’s big recall elections in Wisconsin.

    BlueRobot/Flickr

    — 3 years ago with 1 note
    #news  #politics  #class war  #income redistribution  #unemployment  #war on the middle class  #1% vs. 99%  #austerity measures  #Bush tax cuts  #election day  #job creators  #millionaires  #no jobs created  #rest of us  #spending cuts  #spending cuts for the rest of us  #tax cuts for the wealthy  #tax revenue  #wisconsin 
    Did you know one major factor in Rick Perry’s ‘Texas Miracle’ was government jobs? →

    Jared Bernstein has a little fun with Perry’s declaration that as president he’d make Washington “as inconsequential in your lives as I can.”

    Over the last few years, government jobs have been awfully consequential in Texas: 47% of all government jobs added in the US between 2007 and 2010 were added in Texas.

    The chart shows that Texas employment wasn’t down much at all in these years, as the state lost only 53,000 jobs.  But looming behind that number are large losses in the private sector (down 178,000) and large gains (up 125,000) in government jobs.

    Source: BLS

    Now, this was a period when the nation lost close to eight million jobs, so this churning in Texas is a very small drop in that bucket.  But it sure doesn’t match the Governor’s anti-government rhetoric.

    In fact, as the table below shows, the nation as a whole added 264,000 government jobs, 2007-10, meaning public-sector jobs added in Texas account for almost half of the nation’s public-sector jobs over these years.

    Read the rest…

    Here is irony: the miracle of public sector jobs making an anti-government guy who wants to be president look good. Also too: why didn’t wealthy and corporate Texans with all the tax breaks create more private sector jobs in the past 10 years? Could larger government actually be the solution for our nation’s troubles?

    Related:

    The Texas Miracle: #1 in adults lacking diplomas, tied #1 for low-wages, #1 for medically uninsured, #4 for poverty

    — 3 years ago with 3 notes
    #politics  #news  #class war  #economy  #unemployment  #anti-government governor  #GOP  #government jobs  #job creators  #private sector jobs  #public sector jobs  #Republicans  #rick perry  #spending cuts for everyone else  #tax cuts for the rich  #tea party  #teapublicans  #Texas  #texas miracle 
    …
Michele Bachmann wants to “rejigger” some things and ELIMINATE corporate income tax
Hey, great! Many of us were worried that bonuses for CEOs couldn’t get any bigger. From Think Progress:


SCHEIFFER: Congresswoman, what I asked you was would you go as far as Sarah Palin and eliminate all corporate income taxes?
BACHMANN: Well, of course to do that  we’d have to have a fundamental restructuring of the tax code. What we  would have to do then is rejigger other elements to define revenue and  what revenues would be needed to the economy. We could go that route. If  we went that route, we’d have to have a fundamental restructuring of  the tax code. I am open to having that debate, and as a former  federal tax lawyer, I’ve dealt with whether it’s a national consumption  tax, a flat tax, or some variation of the current system. This  is what I do know. It needs to be simplified, it needs to be fairer, it  needs to be reduced. What we do know is that the current corporate tax  rate is killing job creation.

Bachmann has previously called for cutting the 35 percent corporate tax rate down to nine percent, a move that would cost more than $2 trillion over ten years. This call for reducing or even eliminating corporate taxes comes at a time when corporate after tax profits are the highest they’ve been since 1947.
During the interview, Bachmann  also repeatedly called for the elimination of taxes on money that  corporations bring to the U.S. from overseas, even though such a move has not worked in the past to spur job creation and would cost about $80 billion over ten years.

You know what corporations did with all the money they saved from the  last ‘one-time’ tax holiday? They didn’t create any jobs, but they did give bigger bonuses to their CEOs before hoarding the rest.
Ideas! Bachmann haz ‘em!
Related:
Surprise, surprise. Mitt Romney wants to lower corporate taxes and reduce regulations!

    Michele Bachmann wants to “rejigger” some things and ELIMINATE corporate income tax

    Hey, great! Many of us were worried that bonuses for CEOs couldn’t get any bigger. From Think Progress:

    SCHEIFFER: Congresswoman, what I asked you was would you go as far as Sarah Palin and eliminate all corporate income taxes?

    BACHMANN: Well, of course to do that we’d have to have a fundamental restructuring of the tax code. What we would have to do then is rejigger other elements to define revenue and what revenues would be needed to the economy. We could go that route. If we went that route, we’d have to have a fundamental restructuring of the tax code. I am open to having that debate, and as a former federal tax lawyer, I’ve dealt with whether it’s a national consumption tax, a flat tax, or some variation of the current system. This is what I do know. It needs to be simplified, it needs to be fairer, it needs to be reduced. What we do know is that the current corporate tax rate is killing job creation.

    Bachmann has previously called for cutting the 35 percent corporate tax rate down to nine percent, a move that would cost more than $2 trillion over ten years. This call for reducing or even eliminating corporate taxes comes at a time when corporate after tax profits are the highest they’ve been since 1947.

    During the interview, Bachmann also repeatedly called for the elimination of taxes on money that corporations bring to the U.S. from overseas, even though such a move has not worked in the past to spur job creation and would cost about $80 billion over ten years.

    You know what corporations did with all the money they saved from the last ‘one-time’ tax holiday? They didn’t create any jobs, but they did give bigger bonuses to their CEOs before hoarding the rest.

    Ideas! Bachmann haz ‘em!

    Related:

    — 2 years ago with 1 note
    #news  #politics  #class war  #income redistribution  #war on the middle class  #bachmann haz ideas  #eliminate corporate income tax  #GOP  #job creators  #Michele Bachmann  #rejigger  #Republicans  #tea party 
    Bank of America paid no corporate tax last year, got a tax REFUND of $1 billion, and just laid off 30,000 workers →

    Clearly (if your thought process is anything like the Teaparty Republicans), Bank of America needs more tax cuts. And maybe a big hug.

    image: reagan-was-a-horrible-president 

    Think Progress | 03/28/11: […] with many companies releasing their financial reports for 2010, it appears that Bank of America — the nation’s largest bank— has gone a second year in a row paying absolutely no federal corporate income taxes. In fact, not only did the company use its losses to avoid paying taxes last year, but it actually reported a tax benefit of almost a billion dollars…

    The Hill | 09/12/11: Bank of America earned a dubious distinction on Monday — the firm’s 30,000 job cuts are more than double what any other U.S.-based employer has announced so far this year, according to a employment tracking group…

    On the bright side: I’m quite sure this news will in no way effect the annual bonus amounts of Bank of America’s CEOs — except to make them bigger. Rick Perry would remind these laid-off formerly middle-class bank workers that they’re free to move to Texas and compete for a minimum wage job with no benefits. Win-win.

    Trickle down, plebians!

    — 2 years ago with 5 notes
    #news  #politics  #class war  #income redistribution  #unemployment  #war on the middle class  #$1 billion tax refund  #30K workers  #bank of america  #GOP  #job creators  #jobs  #lay offs  #no federal corporate taxes  #plutocracy  #Republicans  #spending cuts for the rest of us  #tax cuts for the wealthy  #tea party 
    Thousands of jobs created per month in 2011 (data source)
…
John Boehner talked about jobs. Yawn.
JED LEWISON discusses John Boehner’s jobs speech:

As anyone with a pulse could have predicted, Boehner blamed weak job growth on President Obama, saying:
“Job creators in America are  essentially on strike,” Mr. Boehner said, according to excerpts released  by the Speaker’s office. “The problem is not confusion about the  policies. The problem is the policies.”
That’s got to be the stupidest thing John  Boehner has ever said. He’s basically saying that business owners would  rather protest the nation’s fiscal and regulatory policy than make  sense. But businesses don’t go “on strike” when there’s demand for their  services and profit to be made. And even if they did, other businesses  step in and meet the demand.
No, the problem is not that “job creators”  have gone “on strike.” The problem is that there isn’t enough demand  for their products and services. Boehner’s fundamental misunderstanding  of this basic fact is reflected in his belief that the deficit reduction  super committee is actually a jobs committee:
“The joint committee is a jobs committee. Its mission is to reduce the deficit that is threatening job creation in our country.”
If there were any truth to what Boehner  said, if “job creators” really were “on strike” and if they really did  believe that “the joint committee is a jobs committee,” then job growth  would have soared after the conclusion of the debt deal in early August.  Instead, this is what happened: (see graph above)

Once again, the job creators are working and middle class Americans who have a paycheck and the income to spend on things they want. No good pay, no job, no demand for products or services.
Wealthy people and corporations who hoard their tax cuts, offshore  what were formerly U.S. jobs, and / or increase their CEO bonuses year  after year? That would be the OPPOSITE of job creators.

    Thousands of jobs created per month in 2011 (data source)

    John Boehner talked about jobs. Yawn.

    JED LEWISON discusses John Boehner’s jobs speech:

    As anyone with a pulse could have predicted, Boehner blamed weak job growth on President Obama, saying:

    “Job creators in America are essentially on strike,” Mr. Boehner said, according to excerpts released by the Speaker’s office. “The problem is not confusion about the policies. The problem is the policies.”

    That’s got to be the stupidest thing John Boehner has ever said. He’s basically saying that business owners would rather protest the nation’s fiscal and regulatory policy than make sense. But businesses don’t go “on strike” when there’s demand for their services and profit to be made. And even if they did, other businesses step in and meet the demand.

    No, the problem is not that “job creators” have gone “on strike.” The problem is that there isn’t enough demand for their products and services. Boehner’s fundamental misunderstanding of this basic fact is reflected in his belief that the deficit reduction super committee is actually a jobs committee:

    “The joint committee is a jobs committee. Its mission is to reduce the deficit that is threatening job creation in our country.”

    If there were any truth to what Boehner said, if “job creators” really were “on strike” and if they really did believe that “the joint committee is a jobs committee,” then job growth would have soared after the conclusion of the debt deal in early August. Instead, this is what happened: (see graph above)

    Once again, the job creators are working and middle class Americans who have a paycheck and the income to spend on things they want. No good pay, no job, no demand for products or services.

    Wealthy people and corporations who hoard their tax cuts, offshore what were formerly U.S. jobs, and / or increase their CEO bonuses year after year? That would be the OPPOSITE of job creators.

    — 2 years ago with 4 notes
    #economy  #unemployment  #income redistribution  #class war  #war on the middle class  #politics  #GOP  #Republicans  #tea party  #middle-class  #John Boehner  #speech  #jobs  #tax cuts for the wealthy  #demand  #working class  #john bolton  #supply  #job creators  #spending cuts for the rest of us  #plutocracy  #typical 
    The United States of Indecency… with Liberty and Justice for ME →

    This article is both remarkable and infuriating. It’s remarkable because the facts about the working conditions in an Amazon warehouse really are a reflection of how many modern Corporatists / plutocrats treat their workers — as disposable and easily replaced. Oh, you won’t crawl through aisles to get 1 item every 30 seconds? I’ll bet someone else will…

    It’s infuriating because it takes mainstream media’s usual ‘both sides do it’ tone. And, yes, both sides are uncivil to each other and undermine the Other. But for Christ’s sake, the struggle, insults, or incivility is not equal (or equally felt) when the Power is held by the Few, and those who support the Few are practically lobotomized by their twisted idea of a Republican Jesus and by a steady stream of Roger Ailes’ and AM hate radio’s successful brand of propaganda. There is no equivalent propaganda stream for the other side. Fox News and Rush Limbaugh are like the 21st century Tokyo Rose for America’s working- and middle-class — that is, IF Tokyo Rose had been able to broadcast on multiple TV and radio stations 24/7. 

    Anand Giridharadas | The Fraying of a Nation’s Decency

    […] Thanks to a methodical and haunting piece of journalism in The Morning Call, a newspaper published in Allentown, Pennsylvania, I now know why the boxes reach me so fast and the prices are so low. And what the story revealed about Amazon could be said of the country, too: that on the road to high and glorious things, it somehow let go of decency.

    The newspaper interviewed 20 people who worked in an Amazon warehouse in the Lehigh Valley in Pennsylvania. They described, and the newspaper verified, temperatures of more than 100 degrees Fahrenheit, or 37 degrees Celsius, in the warehouse, causing several employees to faint and fall ill and the company to maintain ambulances outside. Employees were hounded to “make rate,” meaning to pick or pack 120, 125, 150 pieces an hour, the rates rising with tenure. Tenure, though, wasn’t long, because the work force was largely temps from an agency. Permanent jobs were a mirage that seldom came. And so workers toiled even when injured to avoid being fired. A woman who left to have breast cancer surgery returned a week later to find that her job had been “terminated.”

    The image of one man stuck with me. He was a temp in his 50s, one of the older “pickers” in his group, charged with fishing items out of storage bins and delivering them to the packers who box shipments. He walked at least 13 miles, or 20 kilometers, a day across the warehouse floor, by his estimate.

    His assigned rate was 120 items an hour, or one item every 30 seconds. But it was hard to move fast enough between one row and the next, and hard for him to read the titles on certain items in the lowest bins. The man would get on his hands and knees to rummage through the lowest bins, and sometimes found it easier to crawl across the warehouse to the next bin rather than stand and dip again. He estimated plunging onto his hands and knees 250 to 300 times a day. After seven months, he, too, was terminated.

    ~~~*~~~

    […] Far beyond official Washington, we would seem to be witnessing a fraying of the bonds of empathy, decency, common purpose. It is becoming a country in which people more than disagree. They fail to see each other. They think in types about others, and assume the worst of types not their own.

    It takes some effort these days to remember that the United States is still one nation.

    It doesn’t feel like one nation when a company like Amazon, with such resources to its name, treats vulnerable people so badly just because it can. Or when members of a presidential debate audience cheer for a hypothetical 30-year-old man to die because he lacks health insurance. Or when schoolteachers in Chicago cling to their union perks and resist an effort to lengthen the hours of instruction for children that the system is failing. Or when an activist publicly labels the U.S. military, recently made safe for open homosexuals, a “San Francisco military.” Or when most of the television pundits go on with prefabricated scripts to eviscerate their rivals, instead of doing us the honor of actually thinking.

    The more I travel, the more I observe that Americans are becoming foreigners to each other. People in Texas speak of people in New York the way certain Sunnis speak of Shiites, and vice versa in New York. Many liberals I know take for granted that anyone conservative is either racist or under-informed. People who run companies like Amazon operate as though it never occurred to them that it could have been them crawling through the aisles. And the people who run labor unions possess little empathy for how difficult and risky and remarkable it is to build something like Amazon.

    What is creeping into the culture is simple dehumanization, a failure to imagine the lives others lead. Fellow citizens become caricatures. People retreat into their own safe realms. And decency, that great American virtue, falls away.

    Read it all…  (article via: azspot)

    This Fox “News” screenshot speaks for itself:

    How’d you like to work in an Amazon warehouse if you couldn’t retire until you’re 67?

    — 2 years ago with 13 notes
    #opinion  #politics  #class war  #income redistribution  #unemployment  #war on the middle class  #AM hate radio  #amazon  #America  #corporatism  #corporatists  #Fox News  #GOP  #indecency  #job creators  #jobs  #plutocracy  #plutocrats  #Republicans  #roger ailes  #Rush Limbaugh  #spending cuts for the rest of us  #tax cuts for the wealthy  #tea party  #United States  #usa 
    …
“Contrary to the Wall Street propaganda, Wall Street is a job killer, not a job creator.” #OWS
Full quote (via: azspot):

“Contrary to the Wall Street propaganda,  Wall Street is a job killer, not a job creator. Wall Street banks and  corporations have no interest in creating jobs, educating American  children, or assuring that Americans have health care and retirement  security. They appeal for ever more tax breaks and regulatory relief  only to have yet more money to use as they used their taxpayer provided  bailout: to increase executive bonuses, pay dividends, buy other  companies, buy back their own stock to increase the value of their stock  options, buy political favor, create new financial bubbles, and  outsource yet more jobs. America is far from broke. Our problem is too  much money in the wrong places. Wall Street cloaks itself in the  American flag to gain public favor, but offshores its profits to avoid  paying its share of America’s upkeep—leaving it to the “little people”  to pay for the public infrastructure on which Wall Street profits  depend. Its relationship to America is that of an alien occupier who  comes only to extract, not to build.” — David Korten

    “Contrary to the Wall Street propaganda, Wall Street is a job killer, not a job creator.” #OWS

    Full quote (via: azspot):

    “Contrary to the Wall Street propaganda, Wall Street is a job killer, not a job creator. Wall Street banks and corporations have no interest in creating jobs, educating American children, or assuring that Americans have health care and retirement security. They appeal for ever more tax breaks and regulatory relief only to have yet more money to use as they used their taxpayer provided bailout: to increase executive bonuses, pay dividends, buy other companies, buy back their own stock to increase the value of their stock options, buy political favor, create new financial bubbles, and outsource yet more jobs. America is far from broke. Our problem is too much money in the wrong places. Wall Street cloaks itself in the American flag to gain public favor, but offshores its profits to avoid paying its share of America’s upkeep—leaving it to the “little people” to pay for the public infrastructure on which Wall Street profits depend. Its relationship to America is that of an alien occupier who comes only to extract, not to build.” David Korten

    — 2 years ago with 5 notes
    #politics  #class war  #income redistribution  #unemployment  #war on the middle class  #99percent  #GOP  #job creators  #jobs  #occupywallstreet  #paying for infrastructure  #Republicans  #spending cuts for the rest of us  #tax cuts for the wealthy  #tea party  #the little people  #Wall Street 
    How did the rising tide capsize 99percent of the boats in America? →

    MaddowBlog: This is the graph Ezra used last night to explain why the Occupy Wall Street/99% protests aren’t simply a case of sour grapes and bitterness.

    You have to ask yourself — how is it that the one percent is doing so great? They haven’t been playing more by the rules. Or getting more educated. And — here’s the really important part if you want to understand why the other 99 percent are out protesting and why they’re calling their movement Occupy Wall Street — how come they haven’t brought anyone else along with them.

    Look at the relationship between the one percent — they’re the red line here. And everyone else — they’re the blue line.  If you look at what everyone was making in 1945, there was a while when we were all pretty near each other — there was a while when we rose and we fell together. And then we didn’t. Starting in about the 80s that just stopped. Read more…

    DailyKos: Kevin Drum keeps the focus of Occupy Wall Street front and center with this simple graph.

    Just keep reminding yourself: a mere three years after the financial industry nearly destroyed the planet, Wall Street is bigger and more profitable than ever while a tenth of the rest of us remain mired in unemployment. Even after nearly destroying the planet, virtually nothing has changed. That’s the outrage, not a few folks with funny costumes or wacky slogans. Always keep in mind whose side you’re on.

    Wall St rebound

    THIS ‘GREAT INCOME SHIFT’ means that there has been a bottom-to-top income redistribution going on since 1979 with our current tax laws. The 99 percent pay proportionally more of their income to taxes than the wealthiest 1 percent. Meanwhile the GOP and their benefactors want to convince us that the wealthiest should pay even LESS of their income to taxes than they do now. The Republican party’s plan for a reduction in revenue is to cut programs and services used by the 99 percent. You may wish to vote accordingly in 2012.

    — 2 years ago with 6 notes
    #class war  #income redistribution  #politics  #unemployment  #vote!  #war on the middle class  #99percent  #capsize the boats  #financial sector profits  #income inequality  #job creators  #jobs  #NOT sour grapes and bitterness  #occupywallstreet  #rising tide  #spending cuts for the rest of us  #tax cuts for the wealthy  #wall street bigger more profitable than ever 
    image: via
Rich people don’t create jobs — the working and middle class create jobs when they BUY things
“This is not just another political debate. This is a  make-or-break moment for the middle class, and for all those who are  fighting to get into the middle class.” — Barack Obama, via Obama: The conservative in 2012 – The Washington Post
Here are five ways we could rebuild the American middle class (and CREATE JOBS by giving people more purchasing power):
[M]odestly shifting the tax burden toward rich people would help.  (Modestly, not wildly. No one sensible is talking about raising top  bracket income tax rates back to 70%-90% again. We can start by just  nudging the top bracket back to, say, 39%, and raising taxes on  dividends and capital gains).
Wages as a percent of GDP.
Reducing household debts through mortgage restructurings would also help.
Rebuild our manufacturing base.
And so would doing something that could be accomplished outside of government influence: Companies could voluntarily reduce their profit margins and pay people more.

[…] Wait, what?
Yes. Instead of continuing to increase their profit margins above today’s already record levels, companies  could decide to shift their emphasis from “serving customers and  increasing shareholder value” to “serving customers and increasing  shareholder value and providing a good living to as many employees as they can.
Wow, that last one sounds crazy. But it  isn’t. Our companies have become so phenomenally profitable and  efficient that wages in our economy recently hit an all-time low as a  percentage of GDP (see chart above). Perhaps it’s time our companies  started voluntarily sharing more of the vast wealth they have created  with  their employees.
Read more: MILLIONAIRE’S ISLAND: A Simple Example Of Why ‘Rich People’ Don’t Create Jobs by Henry Blodget

If the GOP gets their way and the top 10% are given even more tax cuts, loopholes and subsidies, how will that create any jobs? It won’t — it doesn’t matter how much more money the wealthy are allowed to amass, the bottom 90% still won’t be able to afford to buy anything, our middle class will continue to shrink and die, and our economy will remain frozen.

    image: via

    Rich people don’t create jobs — the working and middle class create jobs when they BUY things

    “This is not just another political debate. This is a make-or-break moment for the middle class, and for all those who are fighting to get into the middle class.” — Barack Obama, via Obama: The conservative in 2012 – The Washington Post

    Here are five ways we could rebuild the American middle class (and CREATE JOBS by giving people more purchasing power):

    1. [M]odestly shifting the tax burden toward rich people would help. (Modestly, not wildly. No one sensible is talking about raising top bracket income tax rates back to 70%-90% again. We can start by just nudging the top bracket back to, say, 39%, and raising taxes on dividends and capital gains).
    2. Wages as a percent of GDP.
    3. Reducing household debts through mortgage restructurings would also help.
    4. Rebuild our manufacturing base.
    5. And so would doing something that could be accomplished outside of government influence: Companies could voluntarily reduce their profit margins and pay people more.

    […] Wait, what?

    Yes. Instead of continuing to increase their profit margins above today’s already record levels, companies could decide to shift their emphasis from “serving customers and increasing shareholder value” to “serving customers and increasing shareholder value and providing a good living to as many employees as they can.

    Wow, that last one sounds crazy. But it isn’t. Our companies have become so phenomenally profitable and efficient that wages in our economy recently hit an all-time low as a percentage of GDP (see chart above). Perhaps it’s time our companies started voluntarily sharing more of the vast wealth they have created with  their employees.

    Read more: MILLIONAIRE’S ISLAND: A Simple Example Of Why ‘Rich People’ Don’t Create Jobs by Henry Blodget

    If the GOP gets their way and the top 10% are given even more tax cuts, loopholes and subsidies, how will that create any jobs? It won’t — it doesn’t matter how much more money the wealthy are allowed to amass, the bottom 90% still won’t be able to afford to buy anything, our middle class will continue to shrink and die, and our economy will remain frozen.

    — 2 years ago with 2 notes
    #politics  #unemployment  #war on the middle class  #class war  #income redistribution GOP  #job creators  #President Obama  #purchasing power  #rebuild the middle class  #Republicans  #spending cuts for the rest of us  #tax cuts for the wealthy