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    Paul Ryan’s “2012 Path to Poverty / Discounted Soylent Green For All” budget proposal 
The   very loud tea party Republican base won’t pay attention to the details  of Ryan’s budget proposal or try to investigate it  for themselves  —  Fox News and Rush Limbaugh will tell them everything they need to  know.  That’s how the very loud tea party Republican base will continue to  support and vote for even more corporate wealth and power, ending the  middle-class as we  know it, all because of extreme CONSERVATIVE SOCIAL  ISSUES. 
Tea  party  Republicans claim to be all about the size of government and  government  spending and NOT about social issues. However, this latest  fight over  the 2011 budget and the extreme social conservative riders that their  representatives in the House tried (and failed) to enact  betrayed them. They screamed “Shut it down!” rather than compromise on  items that really had nothing to do with spending and a budget. The GOP  knows the chain they can always pull with this base is going to be  variations of God, guns, and gays. 
Mike Lux at C&L has a good summary of Ryan’s 2012 budget proposal, but begins with some common sense suggestions for reducing our deficit (emphasis mine):

I  can get to a balanced budget a lot faster than that, and do it without   dismantling Medicare and Medicaid, and without taking an axe to Pell   Grants, Head Start, and meals for shut-in seniors and hungry children.   Heck, Jan Schakowsky’s plan balances the entire budget except for   interest payments on the national debt in five years. You can  easily  balance the budget in less than 10 years, even including those  interest  payments, simply by cutting the waste in military spending,  reforming  the government contracting procedures, ending tax loopholes  for  investment bankers and offshore companies, ending subsidies to oil   companies and big agribusinesses, taxing speculative financial trades,   and having millionaires pay taxes at the same rate they did under  Ronald  Reagan.
The  Ryan budget has nothing — not a single frickin’ thing — to do  with  cutting the federal deficit. It is all about income redistribution,   simple as that. If you take away the budget savings Ryan claims from   projecting that the wars we are in will wind down soon, he has  $4.3  trillion in budget cuts and $4.2 trillion in tax cuts. And I bet  you can  guess which fact comes next: the budget cuts are targeted  almost 100  percent at programs that help low-income families and the  working middle  class, while the tax cuts are almost entirely directed  toward the  wealthiest 10 percent.  Continue reading →

    Paul Ryan’s “2012 Path to Poverty / Discounted Soylent Green For All” budget proposal

    The very loud tea party Republican base won’t pay attention to the details of Ryan’s budget proposal or try to investigate it  for themselves — Fox News and Rush Limbaugh will tell them everything they need to know. That’s how the very loud tea party Republican base will continue to support and vote for even more corporate wealth and power, ending the middle-class as we know it, all because of extreme CONSERVATIVE SOCIAL ISSUES.

    Tea party Republicans claim to be all about the size of government and government spending and NOT about social issues. However, this latest fight over the 2011 budget and the extreme social conservative riders that their representatives in the House tried (and failed) to enact betrayed them. They screamed “Shut it down!” rather than compromise on items that really had nothing to do with spending and a budget. The GOP knows the chain they can always pull with this base is going to be variations of God, guns, and gays.

    Mike Lux at C&L has a good summary of Ryan’s 2012 budget proposal, but begins with some common sense suggestions for reducing our deficit (emphasis mine):

    I can get to a balanced budget a lot faster than that, and do it without dismantling Medicare and Medicaid, and without taking an axe to Pell Grants, Head Start, and meals for shut-in seniors and hungry children. Heck, Jan Schakowsky’s plan balances the entire budget except for interest payments on the national debt in five years. You can easily balance the budget in less than 10 years, even including those interest payments, simply by cutting the waste in military spending, reforming the government contracting procedures, ending tax loopholes for investment bankers and offshore companies, ending subsidies to oil companies and big agribusinesses, taxing speculative financial trades, and having millionaires pay taxes at the same rate they did under Ronald Reagan.

    The Ryan budget has nothing — not a single frickin’ thing — to do with cutting the federal deficit. It is all about income redistribution, simple as that. If you take away the budget savings Ryan claims from projecting that the wars we are in will wind down soon, he has $4.3 trillion in budget cuts and $4.2 trillion in tax cuts. And I bet you can guess which fact comes next: the budget cuts are targeted almost 100 percent at programs that help low-income families and the working middle class, while the tax cuts are almost entirely directed toward the wealthiest 10 percent. Continue reading

    — 3 years ago with 2 notes
    #politics  #class war  #income redistribution  #economy  #2012 budget proposal  #corporations  #GOP  #middle-class  #path to poverty  #Paul Ryan  #Republicans  #soylent green  #tea party  #the disabled  #the elderly  #the poor  #the wealthy  #working class 
    All men are created equal, until we file our tax returns
Dave Gilson at Mother Jones went chart-crazy [yester]day. I like this chart above, and the clear bottomline:  the janitor pays more tax as a percentage of income than the  millionaire pays. To me, it seems VERY fair to increase the effective  tax rate of the millionaire to 24.9% to match the janitor’s. 
Maybe  someone smarter than me can explain how the Teaparty Republicans and  the fat cats figure the incomes of the wealthy should continue to rise  and their taxes should continue to shrink (from 35% to 25% in Ryan’s  budget) — while the rest of us have incomes that have either stagnated  or shrunk, or have been lost completely to unemployment. For  those of us lucky enough to even have a stagnated / shrunken income  right now, we know that a millionaire will pay less a percentage of his  income to taxes than we will. 
 The  Republican budget plan: The rich get richer and the poor pay more of  their income to taxes (while getting less federal services). 

See more charts at Mother Jones.

    All men are created equal, until we file our tax returns

    Dave Gilson at Mother Jones went chart-crazy [yester]day. I like this chart above, and the clear bottomline: the janitor pays more tax as a percentage of income than the millionaire pays. To me, it seems VERY fair to increase the effective tax rate of the millionaire to 24.9% to match the janitor’s.

    Maybe someone smarter than me can explain how the Teaparty Republicans and the fat cats figure the incomes of the wealthy should continue to rise and their taxes should continue to shrink (from 35% to 25% in Ryan’s budget) — while the rest of us have incomes that have either stagnated or shrunk, or have been lost completely to unemployment. For those of us lucky enough to even have a stagnated / shrunken income right now, we know that a millionaire will pay less a percentage of his income to taxes than we will.

    The Republican budget plan: The rich get richer and the poor pay more of their income to taxes (while getting less federal services).

    See more charts at Mother Jones.

    — 3 years ago with 1 note
    #politics  #news  #economy  #effective tax rate  #GOP  #incomes  #janitor  #middle-class  #millionaire  #path to poverty  #Paul Ryan  #percentage of income  #Republicans  #tax cuts for the wealthy  #tax day  #tea party  #unemployed  #working class 
    someecards
Class War, Corporate-style
Where are the jobs in America? In the pockets of corporate CEOs:

As most American families continue to struggle with high unemployment and stagnant wages, CEOs at the country’s 350 biggest companies saw their pay jump 11% last year to a median of $9.3 million, according to a study conducted for the Wall Street Journal…

For the surveyed CEOs, the sharpest pay gains came via bonuses, which soared 19.7% as profits recovered, especially in some hard-hit industries. … Net  income rose by a median of 17%; shareholders at those companies enjoyed a  median return, including dividends, of 18%.


Of course to be fair, we can’t generalize and say these corporations are creating ZERO jobs. There are probably tons of new jobs in China and India. Just not here. 
I  wonder when the teabaggers will wake up from the spell of their  corporate masters and quit voting for the party that wants to annihilate  the middle-class?

    someecards

    Class War, Corporate-style

    Where are the jobs in America? In the pockets of corporate CEOs:

    As most American families continue to struggle with high unemployment and stagnant wages, CEOs at the country’s 350 biggest companies saw their pay jump 11% last year to a median of $9.3 million, according to a study conducted for the Wall Street Journal

    For the surveyed CEOs, the sharpest pay gains came via bonuses, which soared 19.7% as profits recovered, especially in some hard-hit industries. … Net income rose by a median of 17%; shareholders at those companies enjoyed a median return, including dividends, of 18%.

    Of course to be fair, we can’t generalize and say these corporations are creating ZERO jobs. There are probably tons of new jobs in China and India. Just not here.

    I wonder when the teabaggers will wake up from the spell of their corporate masters and quit voting for the party that wants to annihilate the middle-class?

    — 3 years ago with 3 notes
    #politics  #class war  #income redistribution  #11% increase in income  #20% increase in bonuses  #350 biggest companies  #92% of D / F grades to Republicans  #CEOs  #corporations  #GOP  #median households  #middle-class  #Paul Ryan  #poll  #stagnated incomes  #tax cuts for the wealthy  #tea party  #Wall Street Journal  #working class  #WSJ poll 
    Income redistribution the GOP way: continue Bush tax cuts, abolish Medicare
[S]imply letting the Bush tax cuts expire on schedule (or paying for any portions that policymakers decide to extend) would  stabilize the debt-to-GDP ratio for the next decade.   While we’d have  to do much more to keep the debt stable over the longer run, that would  be a huge accomplishment. [OffTheCharts]
Jack Cluth — Lest any of us forget how we got to where we are: 

It’s become almost an article of  faith among the cognoscenti on the Right that Barack Obama’s policies  are largely responsible for the mess we’re in. I suppose this only goes  to prove two things:
Americans have a disturbingly short and selective memory, and
Americans are a highly suggestible, malleable, and an easily propagandized collection of barely lucid sheeple.


Follow the money: who’s benefited from Bush’s tax  cuts for the wealthy? Who’s benefited from the Afghanistan / Iraq wars?  Certainly not working- and middle-class Americans. Isn’t it strange that  the working- and middle-class GOP base continues to support those who rob from them to give to the rich?
While we’re busy throwing more of our tax dollars at rich people, oil  companies and corporate CEOs (instead of into our own treasury), the  GOP is trying to convince us that ending Medicare is the only option  available to patriotic Americans who want to manage our deficit.
The truth of the matter is that in order to continue diverting  trillions in potential federal revenue to America’s millionaires, we  probably will need to abolish Medicare.

    Income redistribution the GOP way: continue Bush tax cuts, abolish Medicare

    [S]imply letting the Bush tax cuts expire on schedule (or paying for any portions that policymakers decide to extend) would stabilize the debt-to-GDP ratio for the next decade.   While we’d have to do much more to keep the debt stable over the longer run, that would be a huge accomplishment. [OffTheCharts]

    Jack Cluth — Lest any of us forget how we got to where we are:

    It’s become almost an article of faith among the cognoscenti on the Right that Barack Obama’s policies are largely responsible for the mess we’re in. I suppose this only goes to prove two things:

    1. Americans have a disturbingly short and selective memory, and
    2. Americans are a highly suggestible, malleable, and an easily propagandized collection of barely lucid sheeple.

    Follow the money: who’s benefited from Bush’s tax cuts for the wealthy? Who’s benefited from the Afghanistan / Iraq wars? Certainly not working- and middle-class Americans. Isn’t it strange that the working- and middle-class GOP base continues to support those who rob from them to give to the rich?

    While we’re busy throwing more of our tax dollars at rich people, oil companies and corporate CEOs (instead of into our own treasury), the GOP is trying to convince us that ending Medicare is the only option available to patriotic Americans who want to manage our deficit.

    The truth of the matter is that in order to continue diverting trillions in potential federal revenue to America’s millionaires, we probably will need to abolish Medicare.

    — 3 years ago with 1 note
    #news  #politics  #class war  #income redistribution  #war on the middle class  #Bush tax cuts  #follow the money  #GOP  #Medicare  #middle-class  #Paul Ryan  #Republicans  #tax cuts for the wealthy  #tea party  #top 1%  #war  #working class 
    @liberalchik
~

“Oh, I’m sorry — did I say rich? I meant “job creators“…  when did the business community become so sensitive that we have to  treat them like some kind of rare, exotic animal? Don’t startle them or  they’ll fly away! We need to soothe them so they can nest here and lay  their magic eggs full of jobs, WHICH NEVER HATCH, by the way.” — Bill Maher

We can all agree that they’ve banked enough tax cuts in the past  decade to create many, many jobs. Hilarious how the GOP is trying to  convince us that the wealthy are now ‘job creators’ and we shouldn’t raise taxes on the job creators.
We shouldn’t have to bribe the rich with tax cuts to create jobs. If  businesses and corporations had lots of customers (you know, people with  good, steady jobs and a little extra cash), there would be plenty of  jobs and a thriving economy. Isn’t it weird how things slow down when  the wealthy bank all their extra cash, ship American jobs overseas, and  either stagnate everyone wages or bust unions so they can pay minimum  wage with no benefits?  You’d think there was some kind of cause and  effect going on here.
The GOP would like us all to believe the wealthy might create jobs. Maybe. Someday.

    @liberalchik

    ~

    “Oh, I’m sorry — did I say rich? I meant “job creators“… when did the business community become so sensitive that we have to treat them like some kind of rare, exotic animal? Don’t startle them or they’ll fly away! We need to soothe them so they can nest here and lay their magic eggs full of jobs, WHICH NEVER HATCH, by the way.” — Bill Maher

    We can all agree that they’ve banked enough tax cuts in the past decade to create many, many jobs. Hilarious how the GOP is trying to convince us that the wealthy are now ‘job creators’ and we shouldn’t raise taxes on the job creators.

    We shouldn’t have to bribe the rich with tax cuts to create jobs. If businesses and corporations had lots of customers (you know, people with good, steady jobs and a little extra cash), there would be plenty of jobs and a thriving economy. Isn’t it weird how things slow down when the wealthy bank all their extra cash, ship American jobs overseas, and either stagnate everyone wages or bust unions so they can pay minimum wage with no benefits?  You’d think there was some kind of cause and effect going on here.

    The GOP would like us all to believe the wealthy might create jobs. Maybe. Someday.

    — 3 years ago with 16 notes
    #class war  #income redistribution  #politics  #war on the middle class  #American workers  #Bush tax cuts  #job creators  #John Boehner  #middle-class  #minimum wage  #ship american jobs overseas  #tax cuts for the rich  #the wealthy  #wage repression  #wage stagnation  #working class 
    The incredible shrinking income of the American worker
Except for the Clinton years, we’ve been on a straight downward trajectory since 1980.

Incredible Shrinking Workers’ Income — David Frum:
Workers’ share of U.S, national income is collapsing.
Two questions for the Republican presidential candidates:
1) Is this a problem?
2) If yes, what can be done about it?

The Republican candidates will never be asked these questions. If  they were, their answer to #2 would likely involve either extending tax  cuts for the wealthy and more deregulation (because look how well it’s worked so far!) or passing federal laws against gay marriage and abortion.
The wealthy are gobbling up more of the national income, and the  Republican Party wants to protect them from having to pay higher taxes  on any of it.

    The incredible shrinking income of the American worker

    Except for the Clinton years, we’ve been on a straight downward trajectory since 1980.

    Incredible Shrinking Workers’ Income — David Frum:

    Workers’ share of U.S, national income is collapsing.

    Two questions for the Republican presidential candidates:

    1) Is this a problem?

    2) If yes, what can be done about it?

    The Republican candidates will never be asked these questions. If they were, their answer to #2 would likely involve either extending tax cuts for the wealthy and more deregulation (because look how well it’s worked so far!) or passing federal laws against gay marriage and abortion.

    The wealthy are gobbling up more of the national income, and the Republican Party wants to protect them from having to pay higher taxes on any of it.

    Heres exactly what Robert Reich is talking about.

    — 3 years ago with 2 notes
    #news  #politics  #class war  #income redistribution  #war on the middle class  #middle-class  #shrinking incomes  #tax cuts for the rich  #u.s. national income  #workers' incomes  #workers' share of national income collapsing  #working class 
    …
Cause of the still terrible job market? The wealthy and the “great consumer bust”
Joshua Holland at Alternet discusses the fallacy of the wealthy as ‘job creators’ and the fact that without working- and middle-class consumers, there isn’t a need for more jobs. And without good jobs, Americans have no money to spend:

Consumer demand accounts for around 70 percent of our economic output. And with so much wealth having been redistributed upward through a 40-year class-war from above, American consumers are too tapped out to spend as they once did. This remains the core issue in this sluggish, largely jobless recovery. The wealthy, in their voracious appetite for a bigger piece of the national pie, are the real job-killers in this economic climate.
Don’t take my word for it. The Wall Street Journal reported this week that “the main reason U.S. companies are reluctant to step up hiring is scant demand, rather than uncertainty over government policies, according to a majority of economists” the paper surveyed. That jibes with what business owners themselves are saying. Last week, the National Federation of Independent Businesses released a survey of small businessmen and women that found widespread “pessimism about future business conditions and expected real sales gains.”
New York Times reporter David Leonhardt wrote this week that “We are living through a tremendous bust. It isn’t simply a housing bust. It’s a fizzling of the great consumer bubble that was decades in the making.”

Related:
The growing income gap, stalled economic growth, and financial deregulation
The American Dream: we’ve gone from ‘prosperity for all’ to ‘the rich takes all’
Middle America since 1979: doing more work for less money, even as corporate profits rise
Tax breaks to the wealthy will never create jobs
19 Facts About The Deindustrialization Of America


    Cause of the still terrible job market? The wealthy and the “great consumer bust”

    Joshua Holland at Alternet discusses the fallacy of the wealthy as ‘job creators’ and the fact that without working- and middle-class consumers, there isn’t a need for more jobs. And without good jobs, Americans have no money to spend:

    Consumer demand accounts for around 70 percent of our economic output. And with so much wealth having been redistributed upward through a 40-year class-war from above, American consumers are too tapped out to spend as they once did. This remains the core issue in this sluggish, largely jobless recovery. The wealthy, in their voracious appetite for a bigger piece of the national pie, are the real job-killers in this economic climate.

    Don’t take my word for it. The Wall Street Journal reported this week that “the main reason U.S. companies are reluctant to step up hiring is scant demand, rather than uncertainty over government policies, according to a majority of economists” the paper surveyed. That jibes with what business owners themselves are saying. Last week, the National Federation of Independent Businesses released a survey of small businessmen and women that found widespread “pessimism about future business conditions and expected real sales gains.”

    New York Times reporter David Leonhardt wrote this week that “We are living through a tremendous bust. It isn’t simply a housing bust. It’s a fizzling of the great consumer bubble that was decades in the making.”

    Related:

    — 3 years ago with 2 notes
    #news  #politics  #class war  #income redistribution  #war on the middle class  #consumer demand  #consumers  #GOP  #income inequality  #job creators  #middle-class  #no jobs  #Republicans  #tax cuts for the wealthy  #tea party  #wealthy  #working class 
    …
PROOF that tax cuts do not create jobs: Bush’s decade was a lost decade for U.S. economy, workers
From the Washington Post:

There has been zero net job creation since December 1999. No previous decade going back to the 1940s had job growth of less than 20 percent. Economic output rose at its slowest rate of any decade since the 1930s as well.
Middle-income households made less in 2008, when adjusted for inflation, than they did in 1999 — and the number is sure to have declined further during a difficult 2009. The Aughts were the first decade of falling median incomes since figures were first compiled in the 1960s.
And the net worth of American households — the value of their houses, retirement funds and other assets minus debts — has also declined when adjusted for inflation, compared with sharp gains in every previous decade since data were initially collected in the 1950s.
“This was the first business cycle where a working-age household ended up worse at the end of it than the beginning, and this in spite of substantial growth in productivity, which should have been able to improve everyone’s well-being,” said Lawrence Mishel, president of the Economic Policy Institute, a liberal think tank.

Those are facts — which have a liberal bias, I know. Seriously, what are the conservative / teaparty / Republican voters thinking — that MORE tax cuts, loopholes and subsidies are going to create a job? How many more decades will have to pass before they stop falling for it?  My guess: we’ll all be eating Soylent Green and living in Thunderdome by the time the GOP base wakes up.

Guess who ‘creates jobs’? It’s not the rich and powerful. It’s the working- and middle-class WITH THEIR PAYCHECKS. The job creators are the customers, who drive more business, who drive more jobs to fulfill a demand. When there are no paychecks, there’s no money to spend, no demand — no new jobs are necessary. Which brings us to the unemployment figures we have today.
And by extending tax cuts to the wealthy — which were to be temporary — the only way to make up for a lack of federal tax revenue is by cutting programs and services that the rest of us depend on. The Republican base needs to snap out of it.

    PROOF that tax cuts do not create jobs: Bush’s decade was a lost decade for U.S. economy, workers

    From the Washington Post:

    There has been zero net job creation since December 1999. No previous decade going back to the 1940s had job growth of less than 20 percent. Economic output rose at its slowest rate of any decade since the 1930s as well.

    Middle-income households made less in 2008, when adjusted for inflation, than they did in 1999 — and the number is sure to have declined further during a difficult 2009. The Aughts were the first decade of falling median incomes since figures were first compiled in the 1960s.

    And the net worth of American households — the value of their houses, retirement funds and other assets minus debts — has also declined when adjusted for inflation, compared with sharp gains in every previous decade since data were initially collected in the 1950s.

    “This was the first business cycle where a working-age household ended up worse at the end of it than the beginning, and this in spite of substantial growth in productivity, which should have been able to improve everyone’s well-being,” said Lawrence Mishel, president of the Economic Policy Institute, a liberal think tank.

    Those are facts — which have a liberal bias, I know. Seriously, what are the conservative / teaparty / Republican voters thinking — that MORE tax cuts, loopholes and subsidies are going to create a job? How many more decades will have to pass before they stop falling for it?  My guess: we’ll all be eating Soylent Green and living in Thunderdome by the time the GOP base wakes up.

    Guess who ‘creates jobs’? It’s not the rich and powerful. It’s the working- and middle-class WITH THEIR PAYCHECKS. The job creators are the customers, who drive more business, who drive more jobs to fulfill a demand. When there are no paychecks, there’s no money to spend, no demand — no new jobs are necessary. Which brings us to the unemployment figures we have today.

    And by extending tax cuts to the wealthy — which were to be temporary — the only way to make up for a lack of federal tax revenue is by cutting programs and services that the rest of us depend on. The Republican base needs to snap out of it.

    — 3 years ago with 11 notes
    #politics  #class war  #income redistribution  #unemployment  #war on the middle class  #bush decade  #Bush's tax cuts  #George W Bush  #GOP  #job creators  #lost decade  #middle-class  #never before has there been zero net job creation  #Republicans  #rich and powerful  #spending cuts  #tax cuts for the wealthy  #tea party  #working class  #ZERO net job creation 
    Rick “Secede With Me” Perry: Big Money donors and job creation in Texas →

    RICK PERRY HAS RECEIVED A LOT OF MONEY FROM THE RICH AND POWERFUL — and he’ll likely receive even more during his presidential campaign. What’s interesting is that if top donors like the wealthy and oil companies pay his way, which do you think Perry would be more likely to do away with for budgeting purposes: 1) tax breaks for the rich, 2) tax subsidies and loopholes for profitable corporations, or 3) Medicare and other services and programs for everyone else?

    Read the rest…

    — 3 years ago with 1 note
    #politics  #economy  #income redistribution  #class war  #war on the middle class  #GOP  #Republicans  #tea party  #2012  #middle-class  #Texas  #Big Oil  #unemployment  #jobs  #tax cuts for the wealthy  #minimum wage  #working class  #spending cuts for everyone else  #donors  #rich and powerful  #rick perry  #teapublicans  #texas miracle  #no benefits  #big money  #perrynomics 
    Thousands of jobs created per month in 2011 (data source)
…
John Boehner talked about jobs. Yawn.
JED LEWISON discusses John Boehner’s jobs speech:

As anyone with a pulse could have predicted, Boehner blamed weak job growth on President Obama, saying:
“Job creators in America are  essentially on strike,” Mr. Boehner said, according to excerpts released  by the Speaker’s office. “The problem is not confusion about the  policies. The problem is the policies.”
That’s got to be the stupidest thing John  Boehner has ever said. He’s basically saying that business owners would  rather protest the nation’s fiscal and regulatory policy than make  sense. But businesses don’t go “on strike” when there’s demand for their  services and profit to be made. And even if they did, other businesses  step in and meet the demand.
No, the problem is not that “job creators”  have gone “on strike.” The problem is that there isn’t enough demand  for their products and services. Boehner’s fundamental misunderstanding  of this basic fact is reflected in his belief that the deficit reduction  super committee is actually a jobs committee:
“The joint committee is a jobs committee. Its mission is to reduce the deficit that is threatening job creation in our country.”
If there were any truth to what Boehner  said, if “job creators” really were “on strike” and if they really did  believe that “the joint committee is a jobs committee,” then job growth  would have soared after the conclusion of the debt deal in early August.  Instead, this is what happened: (see graph above)

Once again, the job creators are working and middle class Americans who have a paycheck and the income to spend on things they want. No good pay, no job, no demand for products or services.
Wealthy people and corporations who hoard their tax cuts, offshore  what were formerly U.S. jobs, and / or increase their CEO bonuses year  after year? That would be the OPPOSITE of job creators.

    Thousands of jobs created per month in 2011 (data source)

    John Boehner talked about jobs. Yawn.

    JED LEWISON discusses John Boehner’s jobs speech:

    As anyone with a pulse could have predicted, Boehner blamed weak job growth on President Obama, saying:

    “Job creators in America are essentially on strike,” Mr. Boehner said, according to excerpts released by the Speaker’s office. “The problem is not confusion about the policies. The problem is the policies.”

    That’s got to be the stupidest thing John Boehner has ever said. He’s basically saying that business owners would rather protest the nation’s fiscal and regulatory policy than make sense. But businesses don’t go “on strike” when there’s demand for their services and profit to be made. And even if they did, other businesses step in and meet the demand.

    No, the problem is not that “job creators” have gone “on strike.” The problem is that there isn’t enough demand for their products and services. Boehner’s fundamental misunderstanding of this basic fact is reflected in his belief that the deficit reduction super committee is actually a jobs committee:

    “The joint committee is a jobs committee. Its mission is to reduce the deficit that is threatening job creation in our country.”

    If there were any truth to what Boehner said, if “job creators” really were “on strike” and if they really did believe that “the joint committee is a jobs committee,” then job growth would have soared after the conclusion of the debt deal in early August. Instead, this is what happened: (see graph above)

    Once again, the job creators are working and middle class Americans who have a paycheck and the income to spend on things they want. No good pay, no job, no demand for products or services.

    Wealthy people and corporations who hoard their tax cuts, offshore what were formerly U.S. jobs, and / or increase their CEO bonuses year after year? That would be the OPPOSITE of job creators.

    — 2 years ago with 4 notes
    #economy  #unemployment  #income redistribution  #class war  #war on the middle class  #politics  #GOP  #Republicans  #tea party  #middle-class  #John Boehner  #speech  #jobs  #tax cuts for the wealthy  #demand  #working class  #john bolton  #supply  #job creators  #spending cuts for the rest of us  #plutocracy  #typical 
    The one thing money can’t buy: an understanding that the fate of the 1% is bound to how the 99% lives →

    MAYBE THIS WILL BE REMEMBERED AS THE AWAKENING for American plutocrats and multinational corporations — a very slow, painful awakening, surely.

    The class warfare the rich don’t understand (via gonzodave)

    Is this a class war? Yes, probably. And it’s one of those really long wars, the kind that goes on forever. But in this latest battle, there’s little doubt who fired the first shot. When the financial crisis hit, the Masters of the Universe evaded responsibility and defiantly demanded more sacrifice from their victims. They enlisted their favoured politicians to hold the people hostage and then complained about being unloved despite their crimes. They have won all the early skirmishes – but the people are gathering their forces and starting to fight back.

    “The top 1 per cent have the best houses, the best educations, the best doctors, and the best lifestyles, but there is one thing that money doesn’t seem to have bought: an understanding that their fate is bound up with how the other 99 per cent live Throughout history, this is something that the top 1 per cent eventually do learn. Too Late.” — Joseph Stiglitz

    DESPITE THE PROPAGANDA MACHINE being kicked into high gear on behalf of the Masters of the Universe — with the hackneyed right wing arguments about “punishing success” or jealousy and sour grapes — there is one simple fact at the foundation of the Occupy Wall Street protests: In America the 99 percent are greater than the 1 percent but are asked to sacrifice more and are given less.

    liberalsarecool: When corporations comprising an entire industry fail, and need to be bailed out by taxpayers, there is simply no way of calling it capitalism. Come up with a new word because it is not capitalism.

    Related:

    — 2 years ago with 3 notes
    #class war  #income redistribution  #politics  #unemployment  #war on the middle clas  #99% vs. 1%  #capitalism  #class warfare  #masters of the universe  #middle-class  #plutocracy  #plutocrats  #poor  #spending cuts for the rest of us  #tax cuts for the wealthy  #tax payer bailouts  #the rich  #working class 
    …
Romney tells west Mich. businessmen he’ll fight unions - ”I’ve taken on union bosses before,” Romney said before hundreds at a furniture manufacturer. “I’m happy to take them on again.” […] Romney kicked off his “welcome home rally” with a meeting with 10 business, economic and political leaders, who advised Romney of things on their wish list: less regulation, more certainty, more state power, less spending and right-to-work legislation. One business owner asked Romney to sign an executive order on Day 1 to end a provision that federal work be done by union labor. “You’ll have that,” Romney said. || Note: The King of Bain ‘kicked off’ his welcome home rally with the one percenters, promising to fight for their concerns, which in many cases includes reducing wages and benefits! 
When Romney Courted The Unions - in 2002 the former Governor was actively courting the labor vote. Romney prominently featured on his campaign website a call for union members to vote for him because he would invest in infrastructure, adjust the minimum wage annually to inflation, and have labor be a critical factor in developing the state.

    Romney tells west Mich. businessmen he’ll fight unions - ”I’ve taken on union bosses before,” Romney said before hundreds at a furniture manufacturer. “I’m happy to take them on again.” […] Romney kicked off his “welcome home rally” with a meeting with 10 business, economic and political leaders, who advised Romney of things on their wish list: less regulation, more certainty, more state power, less spending and right-to-work legislation. One business owner asked Romney to sign an executive order on Day 1 to end a provision that federal work be done by union labor. “You’ll have that,” Romney said. || Note: The King of Bain ‘kicked off’ his welcome home rally with the one percenters, promising to fight for their concerns, which in many cases includes reducing wages and benefits! 

    When Romney Courted The Unions - in 2002 the former Governor was actively courting the labor vote. Romney prominently featured on his campaign website a call for union members to vote for him because he would invest in infrastructure, adjust the minimum wage annually to inflation, and have labor be a critical factor in developing the state.

    — 2 years ago with 16 notes
    #politics  #news  #unions  #working class  #middle class  #one percent  #mitt romney  #labor unions  #king of bain